Happy Jane’s Yoga Journey: #05 Selling More Than She Can Handle

Seeing little to no clients at the start of a new year, can Jane figure out a new sales strategy driven by discounts and yoga studio merchandise?
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t was a cold winter day during the last week of December when most of Jane’s yoga studio members were winding up their class routines to go off on a long holiday break. Jane herself had made some plans with her daughter Hannah that she was looking forward to. However, being so very much attached to her daily yoga classes, Jane felt a slight bit of emptiness while saying goodbye to her studio, even though for a short time.

Sad woman sitting with a laptop and a yog mat.

As the holidays arrived, Jane spent some great days skiing in Denver with Hannah. During that time she kept up with her self-guided yoga sessions where Hannah was her only student. Apart from that they also spent some amazing time together, bonding over past memories, and creating new ones too. With time her holiday break came to an end and Jane returned back to her city, eager to begin her new year with a new motivation.

Two women skiing before huge mountains.

With a fresh start to the week, Jane entered her yoga studio only to have her spirit dampened when she found the entire studio empty except for a couple of staff members. This was quite opposite to her expectation for she had thought that the new year motivation would’ve made her members join back early. Alas, that wasn’t the case. Most of Jane’s clients had extended their holidays and a couple of fresh sign-ups, something that was usually during the new-years time, had not taken place.

Empty yoga studio with a grey yoga mat inside.

Jane didn’t feel so good about this situation but being the fitness entrepreneur she was, there was little time to lament. Jane wanted to reactivate her customers in the new year and also bring in new clients as fast as she could. The very first thing she thought was to give her clients and prospects an immediate new year discount which would act as a small joining incentive.

She logged in to her fitness software and instantly set up a 10% discount using the code “NEWYEAR10” and then using push notifications she floated it to all her existing customers. The very same morning all of them would be informed about this discount code which they could use to book tomorrow morning’s class.

Bookee's point of sale with class pack in checkout basket.

The next thing that Jane did while sitting on her yoga studio’s front desk was to activate gift cards. Contacting Bookee’s support executive, she set up a way with which her clients could purchase any-balance gift cards and then send them to their loved ones as a holiday season gift. Once the person would receive the gift-card code, they could use it to buy a class pack or course from Jane’s studio.

Red gift box decoratively wrapped with pinecones around.

This would help Jane in expanding her yoga studio classes to more and more people. But this wasn’t enough. For a very long time, Jane had also wanted to diversify her yoga studio business. Beyond selling yoga classes, memberships, and packs, she also wanted to sell personalized merchandise that would help expand her revenue stream and brand her business in the local circles.

Over the next few weeks, Jane started ordering branded shirts and masks for her clients and then stocked them up in her studio’s basement. Once she had ample supply at her studio, she used her fitness software to update her inventory with multiple items like masks, yoga mats, water bottles, and of course her studio’s branded t-shirts. She didn't even had to list every item separately, for each product (like say a t-shirt) she could just update the sizes and colors and the software would automatically create its several variants.

Bookee's point of sale with masks and shirts in stock.

But now came the challenge of selling them. Jane knew that she had a loyal group of customers who would readily purchase her merchandise, it was just that she had to ease out the whole process for them. For starters, Jane set up the option of partial payments with which she could collect some amount from her clients during purchase and the rest later. Also, she integrated her business accounts with Stripe to accept online payments via credit, debit, cash, and of course gift cards.

Multiple options for collecting payments.

Using Bookee’s point of sale, within seconds Jane could order studio merchandise on behalf of her clients and then collect payments from them within seconds. It was that easy. Almost instantly her online inventory would be upgraded and she would have a clear idea of how much stock remained. 

Online product inventory with variants and stock units.

Everything seemed perfect, until one day a customer came up with a grievance. The shirt that the customer had purchased from Jane didn’t fit her well. Jane wanted to correct this mistake, but the size that the customer had requested wasn’t available. Not wanting to create a bad rep, Jane immediately initiated a full refund. Within seconds the money got credited back to the customer via its original route.

Option to refund client for a previous order.

Using a modern fitness studio software like Bookee, Jane was able to not just diversify her business against off-seasons, she literally broke down anything that stood between her and her sale. Fantastic!

Wish to diversify and expand your fitness business too? Hop on to a 15-minute call to see how the best fitness software can help.

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